FALL SAFETY: Stay mindful of falling tire pressure, falling space heaters, falling from ladders, more

The land navigation course is not the only place autumn happens. In this Fort Benning file photo, B Company, 1st Battalion, 50th Infantry Regiment, trainees learn land navigation. Read about weather and other changes that Soldiers, civilians, family members – really, everyone – should keep in mind for safety. (U.S. Army photo by Markeith Horace, Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning Public Affairs)

By the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center

In addition to the changing of the leaves and the shortening of daylight, autumn brings with it maintenance tasks requiring full attention.

To help you prepare for the changing weather of the fall, here are some helpful autumn safety practices:

Driving Safety: There are multiple autumn safety issues that relate to the road. Since days are getting shorter during the fall, more driving will occur when it is dark out. This can lead to drowsiness, which leads to more accidents. Plan for more rest throughout the season. School buses will now be present in the morning and small children walking to the bus. Leaves may cover the road and become slippery with weather. This requires careful road travel, especially for bicycles and motorcycles. Tire pressure can be affected by the cool nights and warm days of autumn. Make sure to check tire pressure throughout the season.

Weather Safety: Summer often comes to mind when you think of sunscreen, but you should also apply it during fall to protect your skin from the sun. When hiking or camping, be aware of quickly-changing weather conditions, especially during late fall. Mountain hiking can be particularly dangerous because of the potential for colder temperatures, ice and snow as you get higher. Bring along plenty of warm clothing and blankets on a camping trip.

Home Safety: Gutter-cleaning and other outdoor home maintenance projects present the risk of falls. Secure your ladder before removing debris from your gutters or handling other repairs on or near your roof. Tools should be in proper working order and put away as soon as you are finished to prevent injuries. Some homeowners burn leaves or have bonfires in the backyard during the fall months. Avoid burning on windy, dry days. A water source nearby helps prevent the fire from spreading if it goes outside of the burning area. Children need to understand the basics of fire safety if they are outdoors during this time.

Lower Temperatures: As autumn comes into full swing, the temperatures may lower in your area, which can lead to several safety issues. When using portable space heaters to warm the house, keep them away from water, curtains and flammable items. Do not leave a space heater unattended and buy one that shuts off automatically if it falls over. Keep your home ventilated even if the temperatures drop to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Use carbon monoxide detectors and have your home heating systems inspected before the temperature drops.

Child Safety: A pile full of leaves gives children a way to enjoy fall, but the leaves also present a safety concern. Piling leaves on the street invites children to play near traffic, leaving them at risk for getting hit by cars. A driver might not realize a child is present if she is buried in a pile of leaves on the street. Keep leaves in the yard and put rakes away when you are finished to prevent child injuries. Following autumn safety practices gives you peace of mind that you are taking the proper precautions to keep you safe as you enjoy this special time of year.


To learn more about safety at Fort Benning, visit www.benning.army.mil/Garrison/Safety.

To learn more about safety in the Army, visit https://safety.army.mil.

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