British cadre visit Fort Benning for training observation

Cadre from the British army observe basic combat training Sept. 1 at Malone Range 17.

Cadre from the British army observe basic combat training Sept. 1 at Malone Range 17.

By Lindsay Marchello, Bayonet & Saber /
Pictured from left to right, Cpl. Neil Brown, Sgt. Samuel Smith, Quarter Master Sgt. Instructor Richard Waring, 1st Lt. Thomas Day, Maj. Warren Douglas, 1st Lt. Moose Sarfraz, Warrant Officer 2 Andrew Davies, Sgt. Ryan Rourke.

Pictured from left to right, Cpl. Neil Brown, Sgt. Samuel Smith, Quarter Master Sgt. Instructor Richard Waring, 1st Lt. Thomas Day, Maj. Warren Douglas, 1st Lt. Moose Sarfraz, Warrant Officer 2 Andrew Davies, Sgt. Ryan Rourke.

Sixteen officers in the British army are visiting Fort Benning for two weeks to observe how the U.S. Army conducts basic training.

“Most of us are looking at how the instructors deliver the training to the recruits, and how they accomplish training a civilian to a Soldier,” said Cpl. Neil Brown.

The British cadre visited Malone Range 17 to observe a stress shoot, where Soldiers are put through a series of tasks to elevate their heart rate in order to simulate combat.

“We are visiting all aspects (of phase one training),” said 1st Lt. Thomas Day. “We’ve gone over the road and seen the Armor training and visited different companies.”

Maj. Warren Douglas explained that the major difference between the British army and the U.S. Army is the logistical.

“Your army is 850,000 and our army is 85,000,” Douglas said. “The resources you have, especially at Fort Benning, are far more superior to what we have.”

Douglas emphasized that there are some benefits that are better in the U.S. and some are better in the U.K.

“What we are trying to do is look at both sides and try and come to a happy medium to make sure we have our training standard across the board,” Douglas said.

“We work in phase one training, so basic combat training to you guys. The idea is to come over here to compare and contrast the kind of training you do in order to share best practice,” said 1st Lt. Moose Sarfraz. “Hopefully we will get some of the drill sergeants here to come over to see the kinds of things we do as well.”

Sarfraz likened the cadre visit to the special relationship that the U.S. Army and the British army have together.

“If there is any opportunity to share stuff and make our allied forces’ lives better … we take some great stuff from them and they come over and take some from us then our mission is accomplished,” Sarfraz said.

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